Toronto cop claims Camaro owner was forced to pay illegal parking ticket

When the owner of this Camaro was approached by a Toronto city inspector, he thought he was being held hostage by the city. Continue Reading Below After an inspection of the vehicle, inspectors figured…

Toronto cop claims Camaro owner was forced to pay illegal parking ticket

When the owner of this Camaro was approached by a Toronto city inspector, he thought he was being held hostage by the city.

Continue Reading Below

After an inspection of the vehicle, inspectors figured out the car had been parked with the car’s hazard lights turned on all weekend. When the owner went to pay the ticket, the inspector said he had to give him a little push.

And no, this was not a Batman spin-off.

“I didn’t drive it all weekend,” Aldi Cash managed told the inspector. “That is not allowed.”

The inspector spotted the car sitting on the median, unable to move its tailgate that was resting between its driver’s seat and rear bumper.

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The inspections uncovered two radar detector poles in the trunk of the car, a sign of its electrical problems. It had never had the exhaust checked, and it had never had its tires rotated properly, the inspectors concluded.

Yet it wasn’t until after Cash was warned that he would get a ticket for his poorly parked vehicle, that he realized he should have known better.

Cash said he had parked on a street that had no street signs, leaving him with no way to drive away when he learned he had exceeded the 25-minute parking limit.

His car apparently was the first of its kind to get an illegal parking ticket in this time of increased vigilance over private parking spaces and a popular new number of downtown free-parking days.

Neither the city nor the company that supplies the backside bumper pad for the Camaro produced an explanation for the illegal parking, which it is not known how much the attached spots cost, since owners do not have to pay for stickers.

It also was not clear whether the illegal parking wasn’t meant to be suspicious in the first place or whether the city was just trying to make a quick buck from the problem.

“The seller didn’t give it a second thought. They didn’t want the trouble, the work, the time and trouble of changing the plates,” Aldi Cash said.

It was not clear how many other cars were in similar situations, or how many tickets they received.

Toronto Police said they were unaware of any similar problems and had not heard of any “shadow parking” issues.

But parking woes were the theme of the week as Toronto cops launched a weeklong crackdown aimed at reducing speeding and aggressive driving violations, and as the Crown attorney’s office in Toronto issued a 90-day not guilty plea to a community college student accused of unlawful public mischief over an incident where police used social media to track down what she thought was a CCTV camera at a property he was renting to a corporate tenant.

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