Latinos translation their way into the digital age

Written by L, a, a, u, r, a, , Z, o, r, n, o, s, a, r, a, R, s, a, R, Z, a, s, A Throughout history, Latin American culture has shaped a…

Latinos translation their way into the digital age

Written by L, a, a, u, r, a, , Z, o, r, n, o, s, a, r, a, R, s, a, R, Z, a, s, A

Throughout history, Latin American culture has shaped a considerable volume of one of the world’s most significant languages: Spanish.

Native Spanish speakers have a special affinity for the Hispanic language, and immigrants have likewise brought it with them to the United States and around the world. Across Latin America, there are actors, authors, journalists, filmmakers, musicians, technologists and more who have translated aspects of their heritage into several of the world’s official languages, thus bringing Latinidad into the digital age.

In this video, we talk to Latinx and Latino business leaders about the virtues and challenges of drawing language from their roots. And while some of these media ventures are geared toward new audiences, others are relatable to everyone — including non-Latinx users, who can relate to finding news from their specific culture and place, all in language they understand.

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‘Maya and the Three’

No one’s standard storytelling is complete without a visit to Maya, Bolivia, and her world of mud, crocodiles and gold. A resident of Lima, Peru, the graphic novelist Rubén Pérez (creator of the culture-bending comics Maya and the Three and The Sleeping Bear) explains the phenomenon of recreating the elements of a culture.

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