CDC scientists unveil how campers halted outbreak of deadly coronavirus

Image copyright EPA Image caption CDC researchers say a program that challenged campers to convert seagull eggs into chick paste almost completely prevented the spread of the deadly disease. The CDC says a summer…

CDC scientists unveil how campers halted outbreak of deadly coronavirus

Image copyright EPA Image caption CDC researchers say a program that challenged campers to convert seagull eggs into chick paste almost completely prevented the spread of the deadly disease.

The CDC says a summer camp programme that challenged campers to convert seagull eggs into chick paste almost completely prevented the spread of the deadly disease, coronavirus.

Controlling the risk of infection is the goal of preventing common respiratory infections.

On Saturday, the CDC said it worked with researchers at Emory University to create novel strategies that have helped save countless lives in the past.

Led by the virus research department at Emory, a research team developed two simple strategies that teams at Camp Birdie and Camp Sharky successfully prevented the coronavirus spread.

Dr Jane Kastner, a virus researcher at the CDC, spoke of one idea that transformed chick paste into an incubator for chicks, and another idea that activated an automated system to safely send chicks to predators if the incubator was not being used.

The researchers called the program, called the Chick Paste Protection (SPP) programme, “very successful,” said Dr Kastner.

“Almost no cases of norovirus disease were reported for the duration that the programme was in effect, and there was almost zero transmission of coronavirus disease,” she added.

“We now hope to expand these techniques so that they can be used in real-world settings,” Dr Kastner said.

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US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said the CDC’s efforts have “played a critical role in preventing deaths and saving lives”, while the agency was also getting assistance from the US military to prevent the disease’s spread in a “complex and adaptive setting”.

The CDC’s chief epidemiologist, Dr Adam Springsteen, said when the US Naval Medical Center’s drug-resistant pathogens lab used the new methods to respond to an outbreak, it was “effectively stopping the spread of one of the most common and deadly respiratory viruses in America”.

“These innovations contributed to leading the country in overall [safer] water-borne [on the] influenza and [hypertensive] outbreaks in recent years, which have prevented many lives from being lost,” he added.

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